1 December 2016 Climate Change Newsletter

01 Dec 2016
UNDP-CC-Newsletter dec 2016 diagramFigure 1: Gloabl Mean Temperature made by Dylan McConnel[4]

Last December, more than 190 parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) gathered in Paris to unanimously adopt the world's first binding climate agreement and to push the agreement quickly through the two thresholds required for entry into force in the coming year, 2016. The agreement highlights the political consensus among countries to deal with climate change, and released a clear signal for the global economy to decarbonization transition.

November 4, 2016, "Paris Agreement" came into effect, which started the global transition to clean energy era. November 7,, the 22nd Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP22) was held in Marrakech, Morocco. The Conference was also the first meeting of the Conference of the Parties following the entry into force of the Paris Agreement. At the meeting, the Parties will consult on specific issues such as the implementation of the Paris Agreements, the enhancement of climate action by 2020, and action by countries to implement Intended Nationally Determined Contributions.

The Paris Agreement commited to:

Holding the increase in the global average temperature to well below 2°C above pre-industrial levels and to pursue efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels, recognising that this would significantly reduce the risks and impacts of climate change.[1]

However, there have been voices that it is still not possible to limit the temperature increase below 2°C under current actions and plans. UNEP pointed out in its annual Emissions Gap report.o f 2016 that “even if the Paris pledges are fully implemented, the predicted 2030 emissions will place the world on track for a temperature rise of 2.9 to 3.4 degrees this century.”[2]

Some spiral charts, released recently by a team at the University of Melbourne, point out how close we are to the 1.5 ° C rise in temperature. Realistically, we have little time to keep climate warming within 2 ° C, let alone 1.5 ° C. Moreover, even if we stop all greenhouse gas emissions, we will still be able to sustain a temperature increase of 0.5 ° C because the ocean will "catch up" with the warming rate of the atmosphere.[3]

Thus, it is of great importance for all the parties to strengthen the five-year review mechanism for countries to address climate change after 2020, especially on implementation of specific measures of Paris agreement and enhancing climate finance commitments after 2025. Though the conference haven’t present a comprehensive method to make developed countries fulfill thei promised climate funds, COP22 in Marrakech still managed to call for parties to submit comments on the governance, institutional arrangements, safeguards frameworks and operational modalities of the Adaptation Fund.

 

[1] http://unfccc.int/resource/docs/2015/cop21/eng/l09r01.pdf

[2] http://www.unep.org/newscentre/Default.aspx?DocumentID=27088&ArticleID=36295&l=en

[3] http://www.citymetric.com/horizons/15-limit-nearly-impossible-why-world-will-almost-certainly-break-paris-accords-2350

[4] http://www.climate-energy-college.net/spiral/

[1] http://unfccc.int/resource/docs/2015/cop21/eng/l09r01.pdf

 

 

[2] http://www.unep.org/newscentre/Default.aspx?DocumentID=27088&ArticleID=36295&l=en

 

 

[3] http://www.citymetric.com/horizons/15-limit-nearly-impossible-why-world-will-almost-certainly-break-paris-accords-2350

[1] http://unfccc.int/resource/docs/2015/cop21/eng/l09r01.pdf

 

 

[2] http://www.unep.org/newscentre/Default.aspx?DocumentID=27088&ArticleID=36295&l=en

 

 

[3] http://www.citymetric.com/horizons/15-limit-nearly-impossible-why-world-will-almost-certainly-break-paris-accords-2350

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