Our Stories

  • Sustainable Water Management Promises Better Livelihood for Fishermen Sustainable Water Management Promises Better Livelihood for Fishermen“Those living on a mountain live off the mountain. Those living near the water live off the water. We live on a great marshland but still have little usable land or water,” said Liu Yanjiang, a local 50 year-old fisherman living in Dahuangbawa wetland of Haihe basin.

  • Upgrading Lifestyle for the Birds and PeopleUpgrading Lifestyle for the Birds and PeopleWith its unique grassland mountains and wetlands, Qinghai province provides the ideal shelter for many wildlife species. With its cold atmosphere and abundant water supply, the Naren wetland possesses rich biodiversity, attracting wildlife like black-neck cranes.

  • Straws: From Unwanted Waste to Biomass Energy and Women EmpowermentStraws: From Unwanted Waste to Biomass Energy and Women EmpowermentStraw was once welcomed by villagers in Xianhe village, Shanxi province as the agricultural by-product that could be used as food to feed the animals and fuel to heat up the stoves and clay beds. With China’s rapid development in technology and economy, farmers no longer consider straw as an essential commodity but instead burn it as unwanted waste during the harvest season.

  • New Ways to Conserve the Tibetan ForestsNew Ways to Conserve the Tibetan ForestsThe Bazhu Village has been peacefully nested on the hillside of the Beng Bu Shen Ge Sacred mountain, beside the Jingshajiang River for decades. Thanks to the Tibetan culture and Buddhist teachings of the region, which instills respect for life and nature, the villagers have been preserving the forests and shelters of many precious wildlife for the past 800 years.

  • Sustainable Forest Management Boosts Development of Carbon MarketsSustainable Forest Management Boosts Development of Carbon MarketsThe mountain scenery of Miyun County has changed over recent decades. Before the 1980s, mountains in Miyun were barren, with only a thin layer of soil covering the mountain rocks. It was difficult to spot trees; instead, there were only naturally-grown shrubs which were less effective in soil and water conservation.

  • Improving Local Livelihoods by Protecting the Ningxia DesertImproving Local Livelihoods by Protecting the Ningxia Desert“The cold winds from the north and the west blew up the sands, and all you could see was sand – everywhere,” recounted Liu Zhanyou, the Village Chief of Liuyaotou, Ningxia. The desert-like Ningxia environment is known for its harsh living conditions, making everyday life difficult for local villagers like Liu En. The Liuyaotou villagers, residing on the borders of the Mu Us desert where the annual precipitation is less than 250mm, have to rely on sheep husbandry as their source of income.

  • Heating the Community Centre with Cleaner AirHeating the Community Centre with Cleaner AirTogether with approximately 9,000 residents, Zhang Shaocheng lives in Zhaofeng, an old district in Tianjiang. In the past during the smoggy winters, they had to bear the repugnant smell of diesel fumes and lived in constant fear of a potential boiler explosion.

  • Medical Devices Factory Combats Environmental Concerns Medical Devices Factory Combats Environmental ConcernsYu Jiao, a young female employee at Zhejiang Kindly Medical Devices Co. Ltd (KDL) has worked for years in the medical devices industry in very difficult conditions. “Our company has a huge cleaning workload at an annual amount of 400,000 or so pieces of fixtures.” The cleaning procedure for all fixtures was manually done, with workers such as Yu Jiao brushing and refilling the cleaning solvents over and over by hand.

  • Producing Paint Using Marine-Friendly Alternatives to DDTProducing Paint Using Marine-Friendly Alternatives to DDTTang Hao has been a seasoned worker in the production of Anti Fouling Paint (AFP) for nearly a decade. He began working in Zhejiang Flying Whale Paint Ltd, Feijing, in his mid- 20s but was unaware that the paint he dealt with every day was DDT-based and extremely harmful to humans and wildlife.

  • Biodiversity Conservation Yields Organic TeaBiodiversity Conservation Yields Organic TeaAs a seasoned tea farmer, Li Mingshui is well acquainted with Xinyang Maofeng tea, one of the most famous green teas in China. “To cultivate the best tea leaves, it is important to find a place with amiable weather and quality water supply. So mountains provide suitable conditions for tea to grow,” said Li.