6 Develop a global partnership for development

Where we are

 poverty redution forum

As a developing country, China is not bound by the obligation of assisting other developing countries. Nevertheless, China has always regarded strengthening cooperation with other developing countries as a cornerstone of its foreign policy. China’s involvement in South–South Cooperation takes various forms and covers a wide range of fields, such as trade, investment and development cooperation, and constitutes an important part of the global South–South cooperation.

Highlights

  • Enhanced South-South cooperation, paying great attention to the special needs of least developed countries, land-locked developing countries, and heavily-indebted poor countries, exempting due zero-interest loans amounting to a total of RMB 30 billion
  • Formally granted zero-tariff treatment on 97% of taxable item goods from least developed countries in 2015
  • Jointly safeguarded multilateral trade regimes and financial system, establishing the BRICS Development Bank, Silk Road Fund and Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB)
  • Initiated building of the “Silk Road Economic Belt” and “21st Century Maritime Silk Road”, known as “Belt and Road” as new models of international cooperation and global governance
  • Actively conducted medical assistance for foreign countries, involving over 21,000 medical staff in 69 countries in Asia, Africa, Europe, Latin America, the Caribbean, and Oceania on 260 million occasions

 


Target 8A: Develop further an open, rule-based, predictable, non-discriminatory trading and financial system

 

China has always supported the building of an open, rule-based, predictable, and non-discriminatory multi-lateral trading and financial system. Since its accession into the World Trade Organization in 2001, China has earnestly fulfilled its pledges, promoted market openness, and actively participated in the Doha round of negotiations and in the policy review mechanism and dispute-settlement mechanism, serving as a fine example of active integration in the process of globalization. Through bilateral dialogues with developed countries and making use of existing mechanisms to facilitate information exchanges between Free Trade Areas (FTAs), China has contributed to the integration of regional trade development and the multi-lateral trading system.

Target 8B: Address the special needs of the least developed countries

 

To fulfil its commitment made at the United Nations Millennium Summit, China began to grant zero tariffs on 60% of taxable item goods exported to China from least developed countries from July 1st, 2010. From July 1st, 2013, China formally granted zero tariffs on 95% of taxable item goods exported to China from least developed countries that have diplomatic relations with China. From January 1st, 2015, it began to formally grant zero tariffs on 97% of taxable item goods exported to China from least developed countries that have diplomatic relations with China (thereinafter referred to as “zero-tariff measures”). By the end of 2014, altogether 26 recipients had real export, with US$4.72 billion worth of goods covered by the preferential measures and concessions in tariff of RMB 2.8 billion. Ethiopia, Bangladesh, and Tanzania are the three major beneficiaries.

Target 8C: Address the special needs of landlocked developing countries and small island developing states

 

China has contributed to landlocked countries’ efforts to develop economies and has provided them with transport services within its capacity. Since 2002, China, Mongolia and Russia have engaged in seven rounds of negotiations on a China-Mongolia-Russia Transit Transport Agreement. It also became a party to the Agreement to Facilitate Cross-boundary Passenger and Freight Transport in Greater Mekong Sub-region, and several other international conventions on goods transit, which have provided effective legal protections for the convenient transport of goods and personnel from landlocked developing countries. To meet the special needs of small island developing countries, China has continuously increased its assistance for relevant countries.

China proposed the initiative of jointly building the “Belt and Road” initiative. Chinese President Xi Jinping announced the strategic ideas of “New Silk Road Economic Belt” and “21st Century Maritime Silk Road”. The aim of jointly building “Belt and Road” is to promote the orderly and free mobility of economic factors, efficiently allocate resources and deeply integrate the markets, so as to encourage countries along the routes to coordinate their policies and conduct more extensive, high-level and deeper regional cooperation, and build a regional economic cooperation structure that features openness, inclusiveness, balance and universal benefits.


Target 8D: Deal comprehensively with the debt problems of developing countries

 

As a member of multilateral economic and financial organizations, China has always tried its best to fulfil international obligations to support the social and economic development of low-income countries. By the end of 2014, China had committed to donate around US $ 625 million to organizations such as the African Development Fund (ADF), Caribbean Development Bank, Inter-American Development Bank and International Monetary Fund (IMF) for supporting structural adjustment of low-income countries, debt relief of heavily indebted poor countries, natural disaster relief, technical assistance, and general poverty reduction. To help reduce the debt burden of some developing countries and facilitate their economic development, China exempted for six times 396 due interest free government debts worth of nearly RMB 30 billion owed by 50 heavily indebted poor countries and the least developed countries unconditionally. 


Target 8E: In cooperation with pharmaceutical companies, provide access to affordable essential drugs in developing countries

 

China actively provides other developing countries with medical services and drug aids. By the end of 2009, China had sent medical teams to 69 countries in Asia, Africa, Europe, Latin America, the Caribbean and Oceania, involving more than 21,000 medical personnel, providing medical services for patients in beneficiary countries on 260 million occasions. China has offered a large amount of free drugs to developing countries, including anti-malaria artemisinin (Chinese herbal medicine), vaccines against bird flu and Type A influenza, and other drugs developed independently by China. In 2014, after the outbreak of Ebola in West Africa, the Chinese government has provided 4 batches of emergency humanitarian assistance worth of RMB 750 million in total to epidemic stricken countries including Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone. At the same time, China has sent 700 experts and medical staff to epidemic-stricken regions, making it the country that contributes the largest number of experts and medical staff.

Target 8F: In cooperation with the private sector, make available the benefits of new technologies, especially information and communications

 

After many years' development, China has built a national telecommunication network that covers the entire country, connects to the rest of the world, enjoys advanced technologies, and conducts comprehensive businesses. In terms of both the network scale and the number of users, China ranks first in the world. Moreover, China is also among leading countries in terms of the pace of technological development. By the end of 2014, the total number of phone users in China had reached 1.536 billion, including 1.286 billion mobile phone users. The mobile phone coverage rate had reached 94.5%. The number of Internet users rose to 649 million, with an Internet coverage rate of 47.9%. 557 million people were connected to the Internet through their mobile phones, increasing from 81.0% of all mobile phone users in 2013 to 85.8% in 2014. Use of instant messaging on the cell phone has kept steady increase, with a usage rate of 91.2%. Information and communication technologies have been widely used in various sectors of national economic and social development, playing a more and more important role in promoting coordinated economic and social development in China.

 

Targets for MDG8
  1. Develop further an open, rule-based, predictable, non-discriminatory trading and financial system
    • Developing countries gain greater access to the markets of developed countries
    • Least developed countries benefit most from tariff reductions, especially on their agricultural products
  2. Address the special needs of least developed countries
    • Net Official development assistance (ODA), total and to the least developed countries, as percentage of OECD/DAC donors' gross national income
    • Proportion of total bilateral, sector-allocable ODA of OECD/DAC donors to basic social services (basic education, primary health care, nutrition, safe water and sanitation)
    • Proportion of bilateral official development assistance of OECD/DAC donors that is untied
    • Market access
    • Debt sustainability
  3. Address the special needs of landlocked developing countries and small island developing States
    • Official development assistance (ODA) received in landlocked developing countries as a proportion of their gross national income
    • ODA received in small island developing States as a proportion of their gross national incomes
    • Proportion of bilateral official development assistance of OECD/DAC donors that is untied
    • Market access
    • Debt sustainability
  4. Deal comprehensively with the debt problems of developing countries
    • Total number of countries that have reached their HIPC decision points and number that have reached their HIPC completion points (cumulative)
    • Debt relief committed under HIPC and MDRI Initiatives
    • Debt service as a percentage of exports of goods and services
  5. In cooperation with pharmaceutical companies, provide access to affordable essential drugs in developing countries
    • Proportion of population with access to affordable essential drugs on a sustainable basis
  6. In cooperation with the private sector, make available the benefits of new technologies, especially information and communications
    • Telephone lines per 100 population
    • Cellular subscribers per 100 population
    • Internet users per 100 population